Who we know often determines where we go

In life, we are often selling or promoting ourselves.

When it is time to search for a job, we create a resume and list our skills and experience. Our goals and education are included. A one-page letter is written selling ourselves and pointing out the highlights on the resume that correlate with the job applied for. Being clear and concise is important. Action verbs are required. This precise package boasts of what we know and what we have accomplished.

A freelance writer does the same thing when pitching an idea to an editor. She writes a lead to capture attention, explains her idea, and sells why she is the one to write the article. This often includes biographical information of resume highlights. Since the query is only one page long, great skill is necessary to pack all that information into those few of paragraphs. Again, we’re making promises based on our creativity and our experiences. Action verbs are required.

Even in social gatherings, we seem to hone in on what people do, what they know. Often the first question a person asks when greeting a new person is, “What do you do?”  “Where do you work?” “What do you study?” “Where do you go to school?” It’s about what you do, not necessarily who you are.

 

Who we know just as important as what we know

Still, it often isn’t what you know that matters most. It is who you know. At a social gathering, the guests have one thing in common at least: they know the host or hostess.

In first jobs, who we know may be important. Companies want to hire people with experience, but how does one get experience until one gets hired? Yes, internships, co-ops, apprenticeships, summer jobs, or part-time jobs all contribute in the search because they build experience. Yet, relationships are super important. The relationships built during the work help us get to the next step or stage.

References from those who admire your work ethic or skill or enthusiasm help. Finding a job through word of mouth is a blessing. I know some who have found employment or advancement this way.

See, we should always be learning so what we know is always expanding and changing. If we have a goal or dream and someone believes in this goal or dream or in the person, a door can be opened. Every day of our life, we are dealing with people and others are watching. There can’t be a what without a who.

 

Trust God to open doors

Some of the “who” are more important than others. The most important who to know is Jesus because through prayer, He can open doors. Jesus knows what we have done and what we can do. He knows our dreams, our strengths, our weaknesses, and our potential. He knows our purpose. When He opens doors, walk through with anticipation.

So if you’re looking for work, don’t get sad if your what isn’t where you want it to be. Remember who you know. It will all work out. Pray and watch. It is often fun to look back and see how a story unfolded and who the key players were that brought you to where you are now.

Be sure to thank them and thank Him!

 

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

6 thoughts on “Who we know often determines where we go

  1. Well said, Michelle! My husband lost his job of 21 years 6 months ago. He’s been in the same type of position for nearly 30.
    But, he’s not skilled at networking (besides being *old*), so the hunt is going very slow.
    We’re relying heavily on prayer and believing that God is doing something big in this transition.

    1. Brenda, I’m sorry to hear of his job loss. My husband and I have been in that position so know the emotions that go along with that. It did take awhile, but he found a good job again. I will keep you both in my prayers.

  2. My work history is not that extensive. I worked in a drug store (in Stoughton) for 2 years, in the library of an elementary school (Cambridge), and in the library at the Wisconsin Stare Journal for 14 years. I embarrassed myself when I applied for the job at the WSJ. I was WAY overdressed for the job I was applying for, but God was good to me and gave it to me anyway. LOL I enjoyed that job.

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